Death From Above 1979 and Royal Blood usher in Night of the Living Riffs

Death From Above 1979 and Royal Blood usher in Night of the Living Riffs

Death From Above 1979 and Royal Blood usher in Night of the Living Riffs

How can a two piece bands make so much more noise than their more numerically blessed brothers and sister in arms? Of all the rock bands prowling the shadowy recesses of popular culture, none can bring a crunching, thumping riff like Royal Blood.

Over the past twelve months the Brighton duo have broken from obscurity to chatter of glittering prizes and album chart success in waiting. In an era where heavy bands are turning to Coldplay like stadium epics in order to win favour on the airwaves, they dominate the BBC Radio 1 playlist with an iron fist. The mainstream, against all odds, is already bending in their image.

Their debut album – released on August 25th and streaming now on iTunes (read the review on DIY here) – shows they’ve got big guns left to fire. One in particular, ‘Ten Tonne Skeleton’, rattles, roars and growls like Godzilla with a hangover. ‘Loose Change’ and ‘Careless’ are Jack White schooled on Iron Maiden. Even their ‘ballad’ (yeah, right – Ed) ‘Blood Hands’ stands a thousand feet high.

But Royal Blood don’t stand alone. Two short weeks after their full length hits the streets, the Godfathers return. If there’s one band that Royal Blood wouldn’t have expected to join the Autumn fray, it would probably have been Death From Above 1979. Ten years since their practically perfect debut album, that’s exactly what they’re doing.

‘The Physical World’ is one hell of a gamble for a band with a flawless back catalogue, and yet they show every sign of pulling it off. On the very same night ‘Royal Blood’ streams online, DFA1979’s ‘Government Trash’ also finds it’s way to the web. Handed out on physical CD to fans at a warm up show last week, there’s no military PR campaign dictating drop dates here. Instead, there is only glorious noise.

But rather than fight for the same space, something magical happens. This isn’t two bands fighting for the space, but a movement; a flat out assault on the senses. Sure, Taylor Swift may have brought the pop, but really – be honest now – August 18th really was The Night of the Living Riffs.